Audio For Broadcast: Part 5 - Broadcast Audio Workflows

Our series exploring the basic technology and tools of audio in broadcast concludes with a collection of articles which discuss the complexities of traditional studio based and outside broadcast audio workflows, the technology we use to achieve them and the growing potential of cloud-based systems.

About 'Audio For Broadcast'

This series is not aimed at audio A1’s, it is intended as a reference resource for the ‘all-rounder’ engineers and operators who encounter and must deal with audio on a day-to-day basis but who are not audio specialists… and everyone who wants to broaden their knowledge of how audio for broadcast works.

In our frenetic and challenging working lives, more and more jobs are multi-skilled and adaptive, and we’re often expected to cover more functions than we are comfortable with. We can’t all be experts. Sometimes you don’t need to know everything about something. Sometimes we just need enough knowledge to get the job done.

Audio For Broadcast will publish in five parts. Details of all five parts can be found HERE.


About Part 5. Broadcast Audio Workflows

Part 5 is a free PDF download containing 4 articles:

Article 1 : Traditional Signal Flow
We explore of the typical signal flow from source to playout within common broadcast studio workflows. How does the audio get from here to there and what needs to happen to it along the way?

Article 2 : Outside Broadcast Workflows
Outside broadcast adds layers of complexity to audio workflows. We discuss the many approaches to hybrid remote production and discuss the challenges of integrating temporary or permanently distributed production teams.

Article 3 : All Routes Lead To HOME
Our partner Lawo discuss the complexities of challenging broadcast audio workflows and how these can be addressed with a suitably equipped mixing system.

Article 4 : Cloud Based Audio
As broadcast production begins to leverage cloud-native production systems, and re-examines how it approaches timing to achieve that potential, audio and its requirement for very low latency remains one of the key challenges.

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