Shotoku Unveiled Its Compact TG-47 Camera Support At NAB

The TG-47 is designed for smaller cameras that need the strength and power of a traditionally larger PT head packed into a compact footprint.

Aimed at mid-sized payloads of up to 48lbs/22kg, the TG-47 combines the size of Shotoku’s TG-27 with the power of its TG-18.  

At its core is the same advanced digital servo systems of the well-established TG-27 providing exceptional on-air performance at a wide range of speeds. As with all Shotoku products, the TG-47 can be optionally supplied with full VR/AR support as well.

The head is ideal for smaller national or regional studios where production values demand the quality and performance of broadcast cameras and lenses, and where a typical 15-17” teleprompter is required. These environments generally don’t require manual pan-bar control or large camera configurations with viewfinders, hand controls and talent monitors. The head can be mounted on a manual pedestal or tripod or used in combination with Shotoku’s TI-11 elevator to create a powerful and highly cost-effective PTZF&H package.

The TG-47 is also a perfect match for Shotoku’s SmartRail ceiling track system – providing a solution for ceiling mounted cameras with track-dolly movement and a long robotic descender column, but still supporting a usefully-sized teleprompter for the presenter’s use. 

The new design allows for easy maintenance with removable lightweight moulded covers providing simpler construction and complete freedom of access to the internal components - as well as an attractive new appearance. The centralized connector panel combines all the necessary network and power connectivity as well as a lens control and general-purpose IO in one convenient place.

“The TG-47 brings benefits to a wide range of applications found in today’s ever-changing studio designs,” says James Eddershaw, CEO of Shotoku USA. “It is perfect for those that demand superior performance from a small unit but won’t compromise on quality.” 

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