Bruce’s Shorts | 4.11 - Data Security

What are the top ten threats to your company data? In this episode of Bruce’s Shorts, Bruce Devlin runs through the list in under 3 minutes.

Watch the video to hear more abouts these top ten treats:

10. Insider attacks

9. Lack of contingencies plans

8. Poor configuration

7. Reckless use of hotel networks

6. Reckless use of wireless hotspots

5. Data lost on a personal device

4. Web server compromised

3. Reckless surfing by employees

2. Malicious HTML email

1. Automated exploit of known vulnerabilities

You will be hacked; how do you survive it? How do you protect your data? Find out in the next episode of Bruce’s Shorts.

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