Bruce’s Shorts | 4.8 - Trust and Identity

Internet Security depends on trust and identity. What does that really mean and how do you achieve it? In Bruce’s Shorts, Bruce Devlin takes a light-hearted look at aspects of internet security.

You and your users may have multiple identities, which can improve security. Often the identity of a user is authenticated by a username and password. Some sites are authenticated independently by a third party like Facebook or Google. This involves an element of trust.

What happens if a third party is compromised, what do the bad guys get? 

In the next episode of Bruce's Shorts, Devlin looks at authentication.

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