Riedel Unveils Bolero 2.4 GHz

Celebrating the fifth anniversary of the state-of-the-art wireless intercom system Bolero, Riedel Communications has unveiled Bolero 2.4 GHz.

Instead of Bolero’s standard DECT band, this new iteration operates on the 2.4 GHz band, allowing customers in regions where DECT carrier frequencies are either limited or unavailable — such as China, India, and South Korea — to profit from Bolero’s versatility, reliability, and unrivalled feature set in navigating difficult RF environments.

Bolero 2.4 GHz uses a practically identical feature set and offers the same three network modes as the DECT version: Integrated, Standalone Link, and Standalone 2110 (AES67). The 2.4 GHz band limits use to eight beltpacks per antenna instead of 10, but allows for connectivity anywhere, with just one “Global” region for 2.4 GHz antennas. The 2.4 GHz iteration also comes with Bolero’s high-clarity voice codec and its unrivalled multipath tolerant receiver (ADR) technology adapted to 2.4 GHz, allowing the system to continuously adapt to changing RF reflection environments. With near-field communication (NFC) touch-and-go beltpack registration; an ergonomic, robust beltpack design; and three modes as beltpack, desktop key panel, or walkie-talkie, Bolero 2.4 GHz is just as easy to use, sleek, and versatile.

While Bolero 2.4 GHz was developed primarily for Riedel’s international customers, regions in the United States where the number of DECT carrier frequencies are limited can benefit from a hybrid 2.4 GHz and DECT system, enabling the creation of massive installations with unprecedented number of users in a limited space.

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