Essential Guide: Cloud Microservice Workflow Design

June 2nd 2021 - 09:30 AM
Tony Orme, Editor, The Broadcast Bridge

The power and flexibility of cloud computing is being felt by broadcasters throughout the world. Scaling delivers incredible resource and the levels of resilience available from international public cloud vendors is truly eye watering. It’s difficult to see how any broadcaster would run out of computing power or storage, even with 4K and 8K infrastructures.

Building infrastructures that can take advantage of the scaling and resilience that cloud systems provide is a new challenge for most broadcasters. The outdated linear methodologies must make room for queue-based load balancing and microservices processing.

This Essential Guide, with sponsors perspective from Telestream, looks at how modern cloud infrastructures should be built and why. It discusses job queueing, resource scaling, and how microservices provide a whole plethora of broadcast processing that was once only available in hardware.

Download this Essential Guide today if you are an engineer, developer, technologist, or their manager and you need to understand how to leverage the cloud and integrate it into your broadcast and post production workflows to deliver truly exceptional scalability and resilience.

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