Nine Pitfalls Of Relying On FTP To Move Large Media Files

Broadcasters are continuing to adopt and take advantage of IT working practices as they transition to file-based workflows. However, some seemingly effective solutions are outdated, have not kept pace with advances in computing power, and are unable to efficiently transfer large media files. FTP, for example, is tried and trusted but its 1970s design philosophy has proven inadequate for large media file transfer.

Over the past thirty years, computer resource has grown beyond all recognition. Modern computer operating systems have kept pace with IT innovation and can support file sizes of 16TB. To meet the growing consumer demand for a better immersive experience, broadcast video data-rates have expanded exponentially resulting in ever increasing media file sizes. The FTP solution of the 1970s was simply never designed to efficiently transfer large media files for today’s broadcasters.

This white paper, provided by Signiant, investigates the shortcomings of FTP and explains why it is no longer a reliable method for moving large media files for broadcasters. HDR, 4K, and 8K formats all conspire against FTP and with security playing a prominent role in broadcast infrastructure design, FTP is definitely showing its limitations.

With broadcasters looking to automate workflows and improve efficiencies wherever possible, the lack of an effective API to monitor and control the transfer of large media files further demonstrates the limitations of FTP. This white paper also discusses an alternative solution.

Broadcast engineers, technologists, software developers, and their managers will all benefit from downloading this white paper. Learn about the pitfalls of FTP and discover the solution.

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