Bruce’s Shorts | 4.21 –  Your Virtual Machines are Cattle Not Pets

For good security you should treat your virtual infrastructure like cattle not pets, or maybe crops instead of gardens.

In this latest episdoe of Bruce’s Shorts, Bruce Devlin looks at the benefits of good security.

Today's episode is about good practice and security in the cloud. Bruce Devlin uses a farming analogy to explain the issues around ensuring business continuity following a compromised infrastructure. Growing crops is a business, and gardening is not motivated by profit.

Replacing an infected infrastructure with a healthy one as soon as possible. How do you do that? Human interfaces slow down the recreation of infrastructure after an attack. This impacys on your business and your brand. 

Devlin looks at the use of repositories to store infrastrucure code. That leads on to impact analysis.

Let us know what you think…

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