Bruce’s Shorts | 4.14 - Media Components Are the New Hotness

Gone are the days of tape and having everything in a single file. In this latest from Bruce’s Shorts take a lesson from the cabinet makers and prepare all your media content in a standardised form to make as many versions as quickly and cheaply as possible but without compromising quality.

Componentised media files and output profiles simplify the productions steps needed for predictable operation of a ‘media factory’ with automated workflows. Non-standard media files needs manual processing to conform with the automated processes downstream.

In a componentised media workflow, the ingest process is where incoming material are prepared for processing. Any files that do not comply with standardised formats will need intervention by a specialized operator intervention.

It is better for the operator to identify and document the incorrect image characteristics, but to leave the processing to the automated stage. That limits the time required by the manual operations and utilizes the reliability of automation.

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