Riedel’s Expanded Vienna Hub Drives R&D Innovation In IP-Enabled Solutions

Extending its global leadership in IP-enabled hardware and software solutions, Riedel Communications has expanded the company’s new R&D hub in Vienna and ramped up its capacity to drive technical innovation and accelerate Riedel customers’ path toward the IP future.

The expansion doubles the size of Riedel’s Vienna offices, which neighbor the Euro Plaza technology park, enabling further growth of the company’s development team and even more robust support for customers across Central and Eastern Europe (CEE).

“The team at our Vienna R&D hub has the talent and creativity to deliver products with forward-looking functionality that has the power to transform the broadcast and event industry,” said Gernot Butschek, Head of Development at Riedel’s Vienna location. “As the broadcast industry undergoes major disruptive change with the transition to IP-based transport of media signals, our R&D team meets that challenge with innovation.”

Riedel’s Vienna team is responsible for front- and backend development, automated test software, FPGA programming, PCB layout, and mechanical design. Experts in the fiber transport, video processing, and wireless communications technologies at the heart of Riedel’s Artist, Bolero, and MediorNet product lines, the growing engineering team stands ready to extend the capabilities of the Riedel product portfolio.

In significantly expanding its Vienna facilities, originally designed to accommodate up to 55 developers and engineers, Riedel is not only hiring additional software developers and boosting its R&D capabilities, but also committing greater resources to the company’s growing customer base across CEE. Thanks to concurrent restructuring and process optimization projects, Riedel also has increased the capacity of its rental and managed technology business to take on special projects of any size and any degree of complexity.

The R&D hub is part of a larger Riedel Austria facility that offers an additional 120 square meters of space for the preparation of installations and managed technology projects. The facility also includes a 100-square-meter warehouse to support Riedel’s rental business, offering the company’s entire product line to customers in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, the Balkans, Greece, and Austria.

“Our offices are well-situated for our growing development team, and they serve as a convenient base for supporting increasing customer activity across CEE markets,” said Jürgen Diniz-Malleck, Riedel Communications General Manager, Austria and CEE. “This is an exciting period of growth for Riedel, and I look forward to seeing the impact of this investment on the Riedel product line and in the success of Riedel customers.”

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