Essential Guide: IP KVM – Delivering For Broadcasters

January 20th 2021 - 09:30 AM
Tony Orme, Editor, The Broadcast Bridge

Having a collection of PCs and MACs stacked under a desk to facilitate the multitude of operational requirements not only proves difficult to operate but challenges our modern ideas around security and makes maintenance almost impossible.

Modern broadcast systems require users to access multiple computers simultaneously, especially when working on program critical tasks and in control rooms. Simple user interfaces are key to reliable operations and improving the user experience.

IP KVM solves these problems and many more. Using IP infrastructures to distribute keyboard and mouse controls along with high quality video and accessible local USB devices greatly improves reliability and flexibility of complex systems. Bulky, loud and intrusive computers can be easily moved to datacenters where they are much more secure and safe as they operate in controlled environments.

This Essential Guide discusses IP KVM, why it is much more reliable and how it delivers improved flexibility. High quality video has always been important to broadcasters and this Essential Guide explains how 4K video can be delivered to user’s workstations.

The sponsors perspective, provided by Black Box, describes with first-hand examples how IP KVM operates in real world operational environments and explains the successes it has delivered.

Download this Essential Guide now if you are an engineer, technologist or their managers and you need to understand the new IP KVM, the improved security it can deliver, and the enhanced working environments it promises.

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