Essential Guide: The Liberation Of Broadcast Technology

May 5th 2020 - 09:00 AM
Tony Orme, Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

For many years broadcasters have been working with static systems that are difficult to change and upgrade. Although we have video and audio routing, the often-tangled mess of jackfield patch-cords is testament to how flexible broadcast systems really need to be to meet the demands of modern program making.

COTS systems have gone a long way to help make broadcast infrastructures more scalable, but the introduction of flexible software licensing has revolutionized how we think about broadcasting infrastructures.

This Essential Guide discusses the development of COTS systems and more importantly, the applications of flexible licensing. Although this concept has been available in mainstream IT for many years, the recent improvements in COTS hardware speeds leading to higher data throughput and faster processing has led to its adoption in broadcast television.

Dynamic systems are the future of infrastructure design and optimizing for peak demand has never been so important. No longer do we have to build constrained systems that are costly and not used to their optimum efficiency. Instead, we are free to greatly improve performance, scalability and flexibility.

This Essential Guide, sponsored by TAG VS discusses the practical applications of flexible licensing, when to use them and how.

Download this Essential Guide today if you’re an engineer, technologist, or somebody involved in greatly improving the efficiency of your broadcast operation.

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