Essential Guide: Microservices For Broadcasters

January 29th 2020 - 11:00 AM
Tony Orme, Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

Computer systems continue to dominate the landscape for broadcast innovation and the introduction of microservices is having a major impact on the way we think about software. This not only delivers improved productivity through more efficient workflow solutions for broadcasters, but also helps vendors to work more effectively to further improve the broadcaster experience.

This Essential Guide discusses the advantages of Microservices compared to the monolithic code systems of the past. Waterfall project management is moving aside for agile methodologies as vendors look to improve how they deliver greater efficiency, scalability, and flexibility for ever demanding broadcasters.

One of the great advantages of moving to COTS systems and IT infrastructures is that we can benefit from developments in seemingly unrelated industries. Microservices have gained an impressive following in enterprise application development and many of the design methodologies transfer directly to broadcast infrastructures.

Sponsored by Grass Valley, we dig deep into the design philosophy that sets Microservices apart from other designs and investigate concepts such as loosely coupled interfaces to improve API’s. Distributed software modules further promote scalability as Microservices can be easily enabled to facilitate peak demand.

This Essential Guide has been written for broadcast engineers, IT specialists, technicians, and their managers to help them understand the advantages of microservices and how they fit into their broadcast facilities.

Download this Essential Guide today to significantly improve your knowledge and application of Microservices.

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