‘Real World IP’ Event Video Series: Part 6 - Norbert Paquet - sony

Part 6 in our series from ‘Real World IP’, a one-day seminar event from The Broadcast Bridge held at BAFTA in London, Norbert Paquet, Head of Product Management – Sony Europe, discusses system architectures, network control, and the business benefits of IP.

After providing an update on the current ST2110 family of specifications, Paquet goes on to discuss the achievements of AMWA and the status of the current NMOS family of specifications, and then explains the EBU Tech 3371 recommendation for the Technology Pyramid for Media Nodes.

To gain the optimum IP solution, Paquet argues there must be a change in mindset, that is, to identify the abstraction between the physical layers and the logical layers as the fibers carry everything – video layers, tally, comms, control, reverse vision, etc.

Watch the video; HERE.

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