Real World IP Event Video Series - Part 4 - Gerard Phillips – Arista Networks

Part 4 in our series of videos from ‘Real World IP’, a one-day seminar event from The Broadcast Bridge held at BAFTA in London, Gerard Phillips, Systems Engineer at Arista Networks, discusses network topologies and ethernet switches.

In this ground-breaking talk, Phillips describes the design criteria for guaranteeing robust PTP distribution, the special considerations for media network architectures, what is involved in programming network switches, and how to choose an ethernet switch for media applications.

Analyzing PTP at the network layer, Phillips discusses packet delivery variance, why it occurs in heavily utilized ethernet switches, and the effects this has on terminal equipment synchronizing to a PTP Grand Master.

Watch the video; HERE.

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