‘Real World IP’ Event Video Series: Part 3 - Daniel Boldt - Meinberg

Part 3 in our series of full length videos from ‘Real World IP’, a one-day seminar event from The Broadcast Bridge held at BAFTA in London, Daniel Boldt, Head of Software Development at Meinberg, uncovers the mysteries of PTP timing and discusses how it relates to broadcast television, the key components required, and how it forms the backbone of any ST2110 system.

Through practical example, Boldt goes onto explain the effects of network latency on timing and packet jitter. He discusses how the evaluated RTP timestamps are used to re-order packets and synchronize them to both the sender and receiver, and in doing so, resynchronizes the video, audio, and metadata essence streams.

The presentation culminates with an excellent example of a PTP solution over a WAN between Cologne and Dusseldorf. The effects and remedies of packet jitter, accuracy, and stability are addressed and analyzed.

Watch the video; HERE.

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