‘Real World IP’ Event Video Series: Part 1 – Introduction – Tony Orme

In Part 1 of our series of full length videos from our one-day Real World IP seminar, hosted by The Broadcast Bridge and held at BAFTA in London, Tony Orme, Editor of The Broadcast Bridge, introduces the problem broadcast IP infrastructures solve, that is, to improve flexibility and scalability, resulting in reduced costs and improved workflows.

Orme introduces SMPTE’s ST2110 and explains how it abstracts away the video, audio, and metadata from the underlying transport stream and in doing so re-invents the essence timing relationship.

By using PTP, each video frame, audio sample group, and frame accurate metadata packet can be individually stamped to facilitate flexible processing and synchronization of the essence streams throughout the workflow.

Watch the video; HERE.

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