Essential Guide: Software COTS For Real Time IP Broadcast

September 4th 2019 - 01:50 PM
Tony Orme, Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

A major development has happened in the broadcast industry with the adoption of software running on COTS servers for processing uncompressed real-time video. Up to recently, this had not even appeared on the radar, but new technology evolution and innovation has now made software COTS for broadcasters a reality.

This Essential Guide discusses the problem to be solved and the solutions to achieve it. We investigate the complex interaction of COTS server hardware and software needed to make real-time uncompressed video processing with low latency a reality.

Starting with the kernel, the generic solution is explained and why the software works in the way it does. We then uncover the inner workings of memory user-space and kernel-space to describe how software latency occurs and the strategies adopted to remedy it, such as kernel-bypass.

A detailed explanation of packet flow from the network interface card (NIC) through the kernel and into the user-space memory is given. Buffers and latencies are discussed and how the kernel-bypass and zero-copy methodologies are adopted to guarantee the high-speed data throughput and low latency demanded by broadcasters for uncompressed real-time video processing.

Sponsored by TAG Video Systems, a real-life example of a working software-COTS multiviewer is demonstrated. Multiviewers are arguably the most difficult systems employed in a broadcast facility as engineers rely on them heavily to provide a source of truth for confidence monitoring and reliability. TAG Video Systems explain how they achieved this.

Download this Essential Guide today to understand how uncompressed real-time video works on a software-COTS server. Understand kernel bypass and its interactions with the NIC’s, user, and kernel memory, to guarantee low latency high speed video delivery.

This Essential Guide is a fundamental requirement for anybody looking to build and deliver software-COTS infrastructures for real-time uncompressed video processing.

Supported by

You might also like...

Working Remotely Means Different Things To Different People, But Everyone Benefits

Cloud computing is helping a myriad of professional organizations expand their reach and implement new types of IP workflows that were not possible previously. It has also allowed media companies to work virtually anywhere.

The Sponsors Perspective: Social Revolution Highlights Need For Effective Media Monitoring

When broadcast TV was the only media consumption option available to consumers – video monitoring was regarded as a luxury. Today it is seen as an essential requirement in all forms of media content delivery.

How Does Your Station Compare?

Engineers and production crews help local TV stations maintain distancing and a sunny on-air personality.

Leveraging The Cloud Keeps Media Businesses Running Smoothly

While cloud computing and storage have reimagined how remote workflows are implemented, they can also play a huge role in business continuity and even disaster recovery. As many major productions have already proven, the key to continued success is extending…

Cloud Native Technology Ensures Media Business Success

As the media landscape continues to streamline the way it delivers content, cloud-native technology, that is, container-based virtualized environments that replicate traditional workflows on premise, is playing a big role. However, some broadcasters moving their assets and processing power to…