Special Report: Super Bowl LIII – The Technology Behind the Broadcast

New England Patriot quarterback, Tom Brady, entered Mercedes Benz stadium in Atlanta, GA on February 3rd having already won five Super Bowl games. And through four-quarters of play, all delivered by a television crew of hundreds of technicians, sports casters and engineers, about 100 million television viewers watched Brady add another victory to his historic play by setting the record for the most Super Bowl victories by any player in the league, now totaling six.

For the directors, video engineers, audio experts, camera operators and hundreds of on and off the field technicians, they can take pride in that without their super efforts, only 90- thousand in-stadium fans would have seen this year’s game.

While Brady may now have six Super Bowl rings to prove his mettle, the professional broadcast crews have the knowledge that they made it possible for almost 100 million viewers around the world to watch and enjoy this year’s sports spectacle.

And, just what does it take to bring a Super Bowl broadcast to life? The Broadcast Bridge assembled our expert writers and asked them to peer behind the scenes and then report on what happens inside those production trucks, graphic suites and encoding video steaming centers.

Learn about the behind-the-scenes techno-magic required to create a Super Bowl broadcast in the 32-page Special Report: Super Bowl LIII—See the Technology Behind the Broadcast.

Click on the link below to obtain your copy of this in-depth report.

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