Essential Guide: Live IP Delivery

October 11th 2018 - 01:00 PM
by Tony Orme, Technology Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

Broadcasting used to be simple. It required one TV station sending one signal to multiple viewers. Everyone received the same imagery at the same time. That was easy.

Today, the content delivery landscape now is far more competitive and complex and viewers are demanding. They expect to receive their selected content in the highest possible quality, play it on their particular device and do so with full control over the experience. The OTT delivery provider that fails to meet these requirements does so at great peril.

Satisfying such viewer demands requires that video providers reexamine their facility workflows. Simultaneously delivering multiple image resolutions, delivery rates and while meeting multiple industry standards requires an entirely new way of thinking about delivery.

To help technical managers address these unique challenges, The Broadcast Bridge has produced a series of tutorials that address the particular issues facing OTT delivery. Armed with the guidance information in these articles, engineers and managers can identify the proper technology, suppliers and technology partners required to develop a best-fit solution. Read on, the answers you need are just ahead. 

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