Bruce’s Shorts | 4.22 — Will AI Take Over the World?

Will AI lead us to a dystopian nightmare or is it a useful tool for the Media Industry to add value? Bruce Devlin looks at Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning.

Cloud computing allows you to scale up and scale down the massive infrastructure that has allowed limited AI to become mainstream. AI is a generic term which encompasses neural networks, deep learning, machine learning and more.

It's not just a future technology, one example of AI in the media sector is Jukedeck. This uses machine learning to compose and adapt professional-quality music.

AI is coming whether we like it or not. It will eliminate some jobs, but it will make other jobs. Algorithms can look for dead pixles, but humans know if the content is entertaining. 

Devlin believes AI will make the media industry more compelling. View Bruce's Short to find out more.

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