Matrox LUMA Graphics Cards With Intel Arc GPUs Arrive

Matrox Video has announced that its Matrox LUMA Series graphics cards with Intel Arc GPUs are now shipping. Previewed at major trade shows throughout the year, Matrox LUMA cards are engineered to power digital signage and video wall systems in both the mainstream and pro AV graphics markets. The range satisfies significant demand for driving multiple screens and ever-increasing pixel counts, with a balance between size, reliability, and performance for different applications.

Available now are three LUMA cards in the mainstream graphics line:

  • The half-height LUMA A310, the only modern, low-profile fanless card. It is ideal for small-form-factor players in areas where quiet operation is a must.
  • The single-slot, low-profile LUMA A310F card for applications requiring more performance, such as driving multimonitor graphics in retail spaces.
  • The full-sized, single-slot LUMA A380 card for even more performance and GDDR6 (6 GB versus 4 GB) than the other LUMA models.

All three of those LUMA cards have four outputs and can drive four 5K60 monitors. (All three can also drive up to 8K60 or 5K/120 displays but are limited to two outputs when doing so.)

For the pro AV market, there are two LUMA Pro cards: the low-profile LUMA A310FP and the standard-height LUMA A380P. They offer the ultimate display flexibility, supporting up to two 8Kp60, two 5Kp120, or four 5Kp60 DisplayPort 2.1 monitors. They can also be combined to drive a high-density-output video wall of up to 16 synchronized 5Kp60 displays. Users can easily add — and synchronize — displays by frame-locking up to four LUMA Pro cards via board-to-board frame-lock cables.

LUMA Pro cards also feature state-of-the-art GPU-based H.264 and H.265 media codec engines, setting a benchmark in their class. These engines are backed by the comprehensive Matrox Mura software libraries, enabling the decoding of over 40 full-HD streams per card.

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