Sennheiser Launches XS Wireless IEM In-ear Monitoring System

Sennheiser, manufacturer of the acclaimed Evolution Wireless IEM systems, has launched the XS Wireless IEM for musicians seeking to professionalize their shows by switching from floor wedges to wireless IEMs.

XS Wireless IEM (XSW IEM) is a complete starter set for personal monitoring and has been designed to set a new standard for simple, flexible, and reliable wireless in-ear monitoring. The system enables users to quickly establish an easy-to-manage wireless connection in the professional UHF range.

“No matter what your musical genre, whether you are rehearsing or performing live, XSW IEM will level up your sound and give you total freedom of movement,” says Bertram Zimmermann, product manager at Sennheiser. “Being able to hear yourself with clarity is a pre-requisite for a great performance. XSW IEM will give you consistency, reliability, and quality audio, and will let you focus on playing and singing your best.”

All this can take a performer away from a good rehearsal or a great show as they can neither hear themselves properly nor how they blend in with the other musicians. In-ear monitoring eliminates these problems: XSW IEM gives musicians a consistent, reliable sound that is independent of the location and their position on stage. The detail and transparency they hear helps them finetune and improve their performance. Any risk of feedback is greatly reduced.

Regardless of tech experience, XS Wireless IEM systems are easy and fast to set up. They will put an end to stage clutter – and give musicians back more space in their rehearsal room.

XSW IEM uses the UHF band to provide a professional-level wireless connection. Aligned and pre-calculated frequency presets get musicians started with ease and in a snap. If desired, transmission frequencies can also be selected manually.

Backlit displays on both the receiver bodypack and the rack-mount transmitter help to clearly see settings even in poor lighting conditions. In addition, the system offers a limiter to protect user’s hearing and a high-frequency boost to increase detail and intelligibility.

For their monitor sound, users can opt for a mono mix (one mix, and the pan control adjusts the volume for the left and right ear) or a stereo mix. The latter provides two options: With Focus mode switched off, the pan control will change the left/right volume; with Focus mode switched on, it will determine which of the two input signals will be heard louder, creating a personal mono mix tailored to the musician’s needs.

An infrared sensor helps to easily sync multiple bodypack receivers to one transmitter.

XSW IEM includes a stereo bodypack receiver complete with in-ears and batteries and a stereo transmitter with antenna, rack-mount kit and a power supply with various country adapters and is available in five UHF frequency ranges which are aligned with the XSW family of wireless microphones and instrument transmitters.

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