Native Livewire Support Added To GatesAir’s Intraplex Ascent Platform

Native Livewire+ support removes conversion stages when transporting multiple audio streams between studios, while Ascent brings overall greater scale and reliability for high-bandwidth video and audio transport

Intraplex Ascent can now ingest and output multiple audio channels directly via IP without the need for conversion equipment, which adds a new layer of scale and efficiency for radio broadcasters managing many digital audio channels between studios. Future support is planned for WheatNet-IP, further expanding Ascent adoption within professional broadcast studios.

GatesAir introduced Intraplex Ascent as a next-generation Audio over IP platform built to transport broadcast and media content at scale. The industry-first cloud transport platform was built with broadcast and IT convergence in mind, leveraging common off-the-shelf hardware to reduce the costs of multichannel contribution and distribution between many locations. GatesAir started shipping Intraplex Ascent in 2020 and has a number of systems in operation with broadcasters today, including one recent deployment with Livewire+ capability.

“GatesAir has successfully deployed Ascent with a national radio broadcaster that is sending 32 audio channels between two major studio locations,” said Keyur Parikh, Vice President of Engineering, GatesAir. “They are directly connecting to the Livewire studios, providing encoding and reliable transport across public IP networks. Our high-density platform ensures seamless integration into Livewire networks without the need for audio converters. Our customers benefit from simplified integration and capital cost reduction.”

As with all Intraplex transport applications, GatesAir’s Dynamic Stream Splicing (DSS) software supports reliable transport across redundant networks, and optimizes stream integrity through protection against jitter, packet losses and network failures. Within Ascent, DSS software also supports duplication of SRT streams with video and audio over separate network paths, leveraging a single stream-splicing buffer for hitless protection against errors and failures.

Parikh says that no matter how Ascent is used, broadcasters can trust its reliable cloud platform to manage high-bandwidth, high-volume and high-value media content for any transport application and over any system architecture. This showcases Ascent’s strengths as a software-defined system that drives the hardware scalability curve.

“Intraplex Ascent is built to work natively with IP protocol, and IP-based transport is becoming ubiquitous within studio and STL connections,” said Parikh. “Whether sending content over cable, DSL, fiber or microwave, everything converges to IP, and Ascent’s software-based solution then provides the engine for moving large volumes of media content for ATSC 1.0/3.0 television and FM radio networks. We are bringing the scalability of the cloud to move content between multiple sites at the same time.”

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