PSSI Supports WWE’s Evolving Transmission Needs With Upgraded Dual-Dish Truck

PSSI Global Services has upgraded its dual-dish CK27 vehicle to provide comprehensive support for WWE’s evolving transmission needs. The new and improved truck made its debut on Sept. 24 at Friday Night Smackdown, and was then utilized for the Extreme Rules PPV on Sept. 26 and Monday Night Raw on Sept. 27.

Additions to the truck included a larger 3G HD video router to accommodate more video inputs and outputs, an expanded ASI router, new Evertz 3067VIP multiviewers with X-link to allow the monitoring of up to 64 sources, and additional IPGs allowing for more video sources to and from the production trucks. PSSI also added redundant Evertz Magnum control servers for management and control of the expanded routing and multiviewers. New MediaKind AVP4000 encoders with MPEG-4 and HEVC were included, as well as transport stream multiplexers to support multichannel distribution and 1080P HDR and SDR feeds.

On the receive side, PSSI put new RX1 and RX8200 decoders in place to support inbound feeds and confidence monitoring. Another addition to this build is the IP backbone allowing all compressed transport streams to flow seamlessly through compression, muxing and monitoring platforms and out to data distributions. PSSI also installed dual Eaton Blade UPS systems for both technical power and utility/HVAC power. The UPS system includes ASCO automatic power transfer switches to facilitate a seamless switchover to generator power in the event of prime power failure.

PSSI also incorporated a 4.6-meter, 4-port C-band antenna with hub mounted 2:1 Advantech solid state amplifiers. The antenna, paired with the SSPBs, afford WWE the linear power necessary for today’s higher-modulation schemes, allowing the most efficient use of the satellite bandwidth. Hub mounted solid state amplifiers were added to the existing 2.4-meter Ku-band antenna as well.

The truck upgrades also included redundant computer controls, Dante-based audio and comms systems to cut down on cabling and infrastructure requirements, and additional air conditioning beyond the existing dual 5-ton units to help keep the equipment and engineers cool.

With the new layout and design, the CK27 is now easier for a single engineer to operate independently and provides a more efficient workspace. The larger video and ASI router minimizes the amount of patching required and prevents the cluttered look of an overly complicated patch field. Additional monitoring enables PSSI’s team to provide more feedback on any incoming or outgoing signal issues. Finally, the truck’s larger engineering workspace offers a more spacious feel when multiple engineers and/or management personnel are collaborating on a project.

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