RTS Adds DBP (Digital Beltpack) To Digital Partyline Range

DBP (Digital Beltpack) is the latest addition to the brand’s successful portfolio of OMNEO IP intercom solutions, and also joins the recently launched OMS (OMNEO Main Station) as a key member of a major new product family: RTS Digital Partyline.

DBP is a four-channel/four-button wired beltpack that runs on PoE+ (Power over Ethernet802.3af and 802.3at) and connects using OMNEO IP technology. Its unique hybrid design supports both digital partyline and matrix keypanel modes: for use as a digital partyline device, DBP connects to an OMS; for use as a portable keypanel, including functionality like point-to-point communication,DBP can be connected to any RTS digital/IP matrix product using OMNEO – including OMI cards in ADAM/ADAM-M frames or OMNEO ports on ODIN frames. DBP automatically selects the correct mode of operation (digital partyline/OMS or keypanel/matrix) when connected and switched on.

DBP’s PoE-driven design gives it an unmatched level of scalability and makes it easy to add new users. In and Out PoE ports (two etherCON locking RJ45 connectors) allow up to six DBP devices to be daisy-chained together from the same PoE switch port when used in partyline mode. Up to 40 DBPs can be connected to an OMS, allowing for the creation of an extensive digital partyline system – all in addition to the other wired and wireless devices OMS supports. Depending on the matrix model/configuration, up to 64 DBPs can be connected to an OMI card for ADAM matrices, and up to 128 DBPs can be connected to one ODIN.

While its control layout will be immediately familiar to partyline users, DBP offers a user experience that will exceed expectations. Its intuitive icon-based menu navigation system is presented via a full-color, sunlight-readable TFT display with anti-reflective lens, making configuration quick yet precise for users of all levels, in any light conditions. TALK and LISTEN capability for up to four simultaneously active partylines (i.e. access to a pool of up to 16 partylines) is controlled via four large backlit channel buttons, which can also be assigned for dedicated resources such as relay control.

DBP’s digital audio technology provides increased fidelity and a lower noise floor in comparison to analog. Both 3.5 mm TRRS and XLR connectors are provided for connecting headsets, with three different XLR options available: 4-pin female, 4-pin male and 5-pin female (supporting stereo audio for different feeds on the left and right headphones). Incoming CALL notifications are via audible alerts or haptic vibration.

DBP also supports Bluetooth audio connectivity to a headset, mobile phone or streaming device (via the recommended third-party dongles), making it easy to bring other kinds of devices into the system, and allowing the beltpack to serve as a compact “base station” on a desk while the user moves freely around the workplace. 

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