USSI Global Offers 5G Mitigation Services For Independent Broadcasters And Government Agencies

USSI Global, a turnkey provider of customized network, broadcast and digital signage systems and services worldwide, is managing the transition of major broadcast networks, cable networks, broadcast station groups, and satellite networks as they clear part of the C-Band to make room for 5G services.

However, the company is also making its C-Band Mitigation Interference service, which was launched last year, available to smaller organizations that rely on satellite networks for content contribution and distribution.

With the upcoming C-Band Transition, the FCC is clearing the lower 300MHz of the C-Band. Entities that rely on satellite networks for content contribution and distribution will be reassigned to the remaining 200MHz of the C-Band by 2025, though some areas of the country will be required to transition by early December. Organizations that fail to transition by the FCC’s deadline will no longer be able to receive content via C-Band.

“This is a complicated process, and many organizations simply don’t have the in-house expertise to handle these upgrades,” explained David S. Christiano, CEO and President, USSI Global. “You don’t need to be a major broadcaster to work with USSI Global. We can help smaller stations, cable headends, universities, government agencies, and even public utility companies make the transition affordable and efficient.”

Antenna issues are central to the transition. Some antennas will have to be moved or replaced, and new compression systems will need to be installed to allow transmission in the remaining C-Band spectrum. Filtering will also be required to eliminate interference and permanently vacate the lower 300MHz. In addition, C-Band users will require new receiving equipment. USSI Global can help with the entire process, including identifying the types of antennas to install and what specific filtering is needed for the transition.

With customized solutions for smaller operations with limited resources, USSI Global can help organizations transition to a different part of the C-Band spectrum, convert to Ku-Band satellite for content contribution and distribution, or adopt an IP-based streaming workflow. Except for broadcasters who received funds from the FCC and chose to “opt out” of their assigned C-Band spectrum, satellite companies are paying the C-Band Transition costs.

From field engineers to warehousing and call center support personnel, USSI Global has added significant resources to support the 5G migration. Through its C-Band Mitigation Interference service, the company can manage the entire project for larger and smaller clients, from site inspection to equipment installation and commissioning. Each transition project is assigned a dedicated team, and clients receive access to a dedicated call center for immediate troubleshooting. 

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