Essential Guide: Practical High Dynamic Range Broadcast Workflows

January 8th 2020 - 09:00 AM
Tony Orme, Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

HDR is taking the broadcasting world by storm. The combination of a greater dynamic range and wider color gamut is delivering images that truly bring the immersive experience to home viewers. Vibrant colors and detailed specular highlights build a kind of realism into broadcast productions that our predecessors could only have ever dreamed of.

This Essential Guide addresses HDR from the perspective of the HVS (Human Visual System) and discusses what makes HDR so immersive. From a technical viewpoint it explains why HDR is having such a massive positive impact on the industry. And from a creative angle it explains the intricacies of monitoring for any program maker looking to deliver the visual edge.

To completely understand how we can leverage the benefits of HDR we must look deep into the HVS to gain insight into exactly what we’re trying to achieve. At first this may seem obvious as we want to improve the immersive experience, but television, like all things engineering, is a compromise. Consequently, understanding the trade-offs between what we can achieve and what is required is critical to delivering the immersive experience.

Scene referred and display referred systems are considered in detail with real examples of screen brightness and how this effects the viewer. HLG and PQ are discussed along with their respective applications.

Providing practical insight, sponsors Telestream discuss how HDR workflows are addressed in broadcast workflows through real-life examples. Due to the differing screen brightness, comparing SDR and HDR images may not be as straightforward as it may first seem but Telestream demonstrate their working solution to address this.

Download this Essential Guide today if you are an engineer looking to understand and build HDR workflows or are a creative and need to get the best out of HDR.

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