Remote Production: Synchronizing Video Sources Over The Internet

Live broadcasts are seen as nirvana in terms of attracting an audience. Presenting a live event, especially sports, in real-time and high quality, draws audiences like no other content. Yet, successfully originating these broadcasts is often both expensive and complex. ​And unfortunately, most broadcasters no longer have the resources, either financial or technical, to stage an entire production crew and on-site production truck at remote venues.

But there is a solution to these challenges. And this technology opens the door to live broadcasts of virtually any sport, even lower-tier games, and local celebrations or events like parades.

Called Remote-Integration Model, or REMI, the practice involves producing a live event by separating much of the technical crew from the actual remote broadcast location.

Camera operators are staged at the remote broadcast site to capture the images. Each camera feed is separately passed back to the broadcast or production studio where the regular staff creates the on-air program. This “at-home” production model can greatly maximize the efficiency and utilization of resources (people and equipment) while also reducing on-site set-up times and costs.

A recent example of REMI includes much of the live coverage of the recent World Cup tournament in Russia. Program elements were controlled and broadcast live from the Fox Sports studios in California, while the games were played thousands of miles away.

This model does bring one more technical requirement, synchronizing the multiple remote video and audio signals into a high-quality program feed. Networks often rely on high-bandwidth satellite and private networks, but those connections are expensive. Smaller networks and local stations need a better (lower-cost) solution.

The white paper, available at the link below, explores how broadcasters can leverage the latest video streaming technologies to satisfy the demands of remote production workflows without the traditional high costs and logistical challenges. The key is the ability to synchronize both capture and production equipment, no matter the location, while relying on the much lower cost public internet to transmit the multiple signals back to the station for assembly.

To learn more about implementing this innovative and cost-effective REMI broadcast model, download this free white paper from Haivision. Click on the link below.

In this white paper, you will learn:

  • About the REMI remote production model
  • Ways to control the costs of remote production
  • Keys to synchronize both remote and studio equipment into a broadcast-quality video and audio contribution feed
  • How to synchronize and stream multiple channels of video and audio over the public internet
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