The Benefits of Cloud-Based Video Service Operations

With near unfettered access to portable media players of all types and faster networks, consumers are increasingly migrating to video providers that serve them best. Quality and reliability are the key drivers for loyal and recurring engagement.

However, as the models of video consumption continue to shift, conventional approaches to video processing and delivery become more and more challenging to use and maintain, add significant capital expense and struggle to keep pace with evolving industry standards. This has left video providers questioning their existing approaches and seeking new, more efficient ones to stay competitive.

With the advent of cloud-based video processing and delivery, video providers can now deliver reliable, broadcast-grade video services with the flexibility and ease of use of a cloud service, while only paying for what they use.

For those considering migration to cloud-based services, The Broadcast Bridge has published an essential E-Book entitled “Video Processing and Delivery Moves to the Cloud” created by AWS Elemental that provides real-world guidance to help video services move away from costly infrastructure investments and toward simple, pay-as-you-go services that let them focus resources where they can make the greatest impact.

Amazon Web Services first coined the term “undifferentiated heavy lifting” to describe the work that organizations do to plan, purchase and maintain their IT infrastructure. In an effort to overcome the shortcomings of traditional video infrastructure and to lessen undifferentiated heavy lifting, video providers must leverage cloud-based solutions from technology vendors in order to reduce the role of hardware-based solutions in the video workflow.

In this Broadcast Bridge E-Book, readers will learn how to choose whether to migrate all or a portion of your streaming video infrastructure to a cloud-based architecture, and why it makes practical and financial sense.

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