Genelec Debuts 3-way Coaxial Monitor at AES

Genelec has debuted a new three-way acoustically-coaxial monitor at the 137th AES Convention. With a compact footprint the 8351 marks a new step in active monitoring. Based on a co-axial midrange/tweeter and dual concealed bass drivers, the speaker incorporates Genelec’s Smart Active Monitoring technology.

Genelec has announced the new 8351 Acoustically Coaxial three-way Smart Active Monitor™ system. The radical step forward in design was developed in response to the need for increasing audio performance in acoustically challenging production environments.

The design of the 8531 closely links the mechanical, acoustical and signal-processing designs resulting in a system that is unique in the professional monitoring industry and represents a bold step forward for Genelec.

The 8351 borrows its size attribute from Genelec’s 8050 monitor. With dimensions of 17.75in x 11.25in x 11in, the 8351 has a small footprint for a three-way monitor. The center of the 8351’s enclosure features the Minimum Diffraction Co-axial midrange/tweeter driver evolved from the 8260. This coaxial driver provides extremely accurate imaging and improved sound quality, both on and off-axis, vertically as well as horizontally.

Front and rear views of the new Genelec 8351 three-way coaxial audio monitor. Note the absence of a visible bass driver

Front and rear views of the new Genelec 8351 three-way coaxial audio monitor. Note the absence of a visible bass driver

The bass drivers are concealed beneath the Maximised Directivity Controlled Waveguide (MaxDCW™). The lips on the perimeter of the waveguide are the acoustic openings for the proprietary Genelec-designed Acoustically Concealed Woofers (ACW™). This results in a interesting aesthetic with the lack of a visible bass driver.

The co-axial midrange / tweeter, in combination with the dual bass driver design, together, form a three-way acoustically coaxial system with an extremely large waveguide (MaxDCW) across the entire front.

The 8351 can be mounted in either vertical or horizontal orientation, with closely similar directivity characteristics as users move off-axis. The extremely smooth frequency response and dispersion pattern lead to outstanding clarity and definition of the audio signal.

The 8351 is capable of delivering 110 dB at 1 meter through a combination of efficient Genelec-designed Class D amplifiers for the bass (150 W) and midrange (120 W) drivers, while a discrete-components (90 W) Genelec-designed Class A/B amplifier applies power to the high-frequency driver. The 8351 has a system frequency response of 32 Hz to 40 kHz (-6 dB), ± 1.5 dB (38 Hz to 21 kHz) with very low distortion.

Like all active monitors in the Genelec SAM range, the 8351 is capable of automatically adapting to acoustical environments using SAM™ (Smart Active Monitoring) technology.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

ZombieLoad And Other Things That Go Bump In The Night

May 14, 2019 may not have seemed a particularly important date for those who edit and color grade on Mac’s and PC’s. But it was. By chance, that day I went looking for the May Windows 10 Feature Update (1903). I was sur…

The Move Towards Next Generation Platforms

Whenever I’m asked about my opinion on the transition to IP, I always state that the impact can’t be appreciated until its history is understood. This brings into context the need for broadcasters to educate and surround themselves wit…

Essential Guide: Immersive Audio Pt 3 - Immersive Audio Objects

Immersive audio transforms the listening environment to deliver a mesmerizing and captivating experience for a wide range of audiences and expansive group of genres.

Taming The Virtualized Beast

Without doubt, virtualization is a key technological evolution focus and it will empower many broadcast and media organizations to work differently, more efficiently and more profitably.

Loudness for Audio Producers

Wild variations in the levels of program audio has long been a problem for broadcast outlets. Due to controversy over varying audio levels, governments have forced broadcasters to specify specific loudness levels for all programming. In this article, we’ll l…