Videosys Broadcast Launches A Camera Control System For The Sony FX6 Camera

Camera control specialists Videosys Broadcast has partnered with Dutch company Broadcast Rental to create a new camera control system that allows broadcasters to easily integrate Sony’s compact FX6 camera and a lightweight MOVI Rig into their HDR production workflows.

Broadcast Rental first introduced full frame cameras with a MOVI rig 12 years ago but advances in camera technology, combined with more and more broadcasters wanting an HDR workflow, the company felt it was time to change the camera to a Sony FX6 in order to accommodate these developments. By teaming the Sony FX6 with a MOVI Rig, broadcasters can now capture filmic shots with real depth of field, stunning AF performance and superb cinematic expression without compromising on the control offered by larger, heavier and less flexible broadcast camera systems.

Founded in 2009 by GP Slee, who has a 30-year track record in the broadcast industry, Broadcast Rental has long been at the forefront of technological development. Based in Hilversum, the company supplies turnkey solutions, MCR, Fly Packs, RF HD/UHD transmissions and state of the art box hire equipment. Its innovative solutions have been used on numerous high-profile projects, from Formula 1, the Winter and Summer Olympics, the FIFA World Cup, the EUFA EURO Tournament and Champions League Football, to the Tour de France, the Dakar rally, the MTV European Music Awards and many rock, pop and classical concerts.

Broadcast Rental first began developing camera systems that involved MOVI rigs in 2012, thanks to a project it undertook with specialist MOVI operator Ben de Graaf (AKA MOVI BEN). At the time a Broadcast Rental customer who directed live sports events wanted to work with filmic cameras in a live environment, specifically soccer matches. To achieve this they needed a system that offered a wireless connection for the signal and for racking/colouring the camera. In collaboration with Ben, Broadcast Rental was able to create a MOVI rig system that implemented all the necessary details.

“12 years on and it was time to refresh the set-up,” Frank Steenbeek says. “Once again, Ben was involved in the project, along with Videosys, which was an obvious partner having worked with us on numerous occasions previously.”

GP Slee adds: “I’ve known Colin Tomlin, Videosys Broadcast’s CEO and founder, for many years and regard him as something of a technical guru. We are heavy users and testers of the camera control, RF links and camera backs that the company develops, all of which help us make improvements to our own systems.”

Having identified they wanted to use a Sony FX6 camera, Broadcast Rental reached out to Videosys to see what could be done about camera control.

The project, which took three months to complete, involved modifying the Sony FX6 so that it could be used effectively in a broadcast workflow.

Colin Tomlin explains: “As the Sony FX6 is not a broadcast camera like, say, an HCD3500, there is a no real way to control it, even Sony don’t make a remote control panel for it. However, they do offer control over ethernet of some features and that was our starting point.”

The new camera control system was inaugurated at the end of May during the final of the Holland Veterans football tournament. The results were so successful that Broadcast Rental will now be deploying the new MOVI Ben system across numerous football matches throughout Europe, including UEFA Champions League, UEFA Europe League and UEFA Conference League games where Dutch teams are playing.

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