Jazza’s ​YouTube Channel Created With Blackmagic Gear

‘Table Top Time,’ from Josiah ‘Jazza’ Brook is being created using Pocket Cinema Camera 6Ks, Pocket Cinema Camera 4Ks and ATEM Mini Extreme. The Blackmagic Design workflow was first used to shoot an eight camera roll playing battle to celebrate the new channel hitting 100K subscribers.

Jazza, an Australian artist, animator and content creator, is globally known for his YouTube art tutorials and art challenges. Growing from a single YouTube channel, which now has more than 5.4 million subscribers and one billion total video views, Jazza and his media company are creating new online channels and videos.

One of the first new channels is the table top gaming focused YouTube channel “Table Top Time,” which features miniature creation and live gaming between Jazza, his brother Shad Brooks and a number of other well known gamers.

To live stream, Jazza is using a mix of eight cameras, including a mix of Pocket Cinema Camera 6Ks and Pocket Cinema Camera 4Ks. An ATEM Mini Extreme ISO switcher is being used for multi camera switching and graphics insertions, as well as recording. They are also using Blackmagic Design Video Assists for monitoring and a number of Blackmagic Design Mini Converter models.

“The ATEM Mini Extreme and some of the cameras arrived the day before we were going to start shooting. There is no way we could have done what we did without them. Without the Blackmagic gear, setting up, providing cards, syncing and managing all that footage would have been a nightmare or we would have had to be less creative,” Jazza said.

For the 100k subscriber stream, he created and played a Heaven vs Hell themed game based on the requests of the stream’s patrons. The stream included a camera directly in front of the gaming table, a top-down camera rigged to the ceiling, two side cameras for tight shots of the players, two on the side of the gaming table and a wide shot camera on a slider. The eighth camera showed the technical director controlling the ATEM Mini Extreme to give viewers a chance to see how the stream was being created.

“In the past if we wanted to film with eight cameras, not only would we have to record on eight separate cards, we'd have to sort through the footage, convert to MP3 and sync manually, and then we'd have to do all that editing. We'd be capable of it, but it'd take days just to achieve what got done for us with the ATEM Mini Extreme ISO automatically within the time we actually filmed.”

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