MRMC’s Polymotion Chat Camera Tracking System Revamped

Mark Roberts Motion Control (MRMC) has upgraded its innovative Polymotion Chat automated camera control software to provide new tiered access points to its ground-breaking technology.

Polymotion Chat Studio and Polymotion Chat Broadcast (plus the entry level Polymotion Chat Pro), now provide a range of options covering use cases from the live events sector up to national broadcasters, and between 1 to 6 camera operation.

Polymotion Chat is an innovative solution that uses a specially-developed computer vision engine to track subjects using PTZ cameras or robotic pan/tilt heads. The system is always available and provides reliable and consistent shots, allowing, at the entry-level, non-video professionals to focus on getting their message across without worrying about camera control, and at the high end enabling increased studio automation and single operators to manage multiple cameras in socially distanced working environments.

The Polymotion Chat computer vision engine detects limbs and builds a virtual stick model to track the onscreen talent, allowing the system to deal with people turning their back on the camera, occlusion, and ensuring that the system doesn't get confused by other faces.

Polymotion Chat Studio is aimed at studios, live production, and larger corporate productions, and features an easy-to-use interface that provides support for MRMC and third-party robotic heads (including PTZ cameras) from most vendors, including Sony, Panasonic, Birddog, and more.

The system supports from 1-6 cameras and adds an advanced tracking and framing capability that allows it to track multiple people across multiple cameras. It can be used either as a fully autonomous system with no operator or for projects where one operator needs to control multiple cameras and the system makes sure the shot is ready for the operator to make minor changes as required. Facial recognition allows for automated presets to be used depending on the presenter.

Polymotion Chat Broadcast is aimed at Tier 1 and Tier 2 broadcasters and adds presenter profiles, advanced integration into studio automation systems, scene recognition, and advanced sequencing for executing pre-defined camera moves. It enables broadcasters to run studio-based programmes in a socially distanced manner with minimal staff and contact with the on-screen presenters.

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