​G&D Joins Grass Valley Tech Alliance

Guntermann & Drunck (G&D) is now a member of the Grass Valley Technology Alliance for better interoperability.

G&D’s CEO Rolland Ollek said: “We’re pleased about the positive feedback on how well our systems work with the Ignite Automation Production Control Software.”

Grass Valley’s President and CEO Tim Shoulders said: “As our customers strive to deliver the captivating content and high production values that consumers demand, the Grass Valley Technology Alliance gives them access to trusted solutions that are tested and configured to ensure interoperability with Grass Valley’s solutions – one of the major hurdles our customers face when deploying multi-vendor systems. We are delighted to see G&D join the GVTA, bringing our valued ecosystem partners to a total of 21 diverse companies that support collaboration across the media production chain.”

G&D’s KVM systems enable computer technology to be outsourced from studios or the production area.

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