At CES, LG Builds The Future Of TV Broadcasting Into New 4K Sets

At the 2020 CES Show this week, South Korean TV set maker LG Electronics announced that it would add “Next Gen TV” receiver chips into six new OLED TV models, including its top-of-the-line ZX 8K TV series that includes 88- and 77-inch sets. LG also said it will build ATSC 3.0 reception capability into 55-, 65- and 77-inch models of its new 4K OLED Gallery TV series, including its 65-inch 4K “rollable Wallpaper” OLED model.

All of the new TV sets—including new models announced at CES by Samsung and Sony—will carry the new “Next Gen TV” logo developed by the Consumer Technology Association and the Advanced Television Systems Committee as a more consumer-friendly identification. 2020 is being promoted as the official U.S. launch of Next Gen TV.

LG's announcement comes at a time when consumer interest in the next generation television in broadcasting standard is low, although—following a number of limited on-air testing across the country—60 local TV stations covering around 70 percent of the U.S. viewing public will launch ATSC 3.0 service this year. The new standard requires consumers to give up their existing TVs and buy these new sets in order to receive a signal that could include 4K HDR resolution, customizable immersive audio and other interactive features.

A number of 8K TV sets were introduced at the 2020 CES Show, although none support the “Next Gen TV” standard.

A number of 8K TV sets were introduced at the 2020 CES Show, although none support the “Next Gen TV” standard.

Co-developed by LG, the Next Gen TV system is the world’s first internet protocol-based over-the-air (OTA) television standard. At the CES Show in Las Vegas, the standard is being demonstrated live by the local Sinclair Broadcasting station.

LG introduced the first ATSC 3.0-enabled 4K Ultra HD TV at the 2017 CES Show, targeting it mainly at South Korean viewers in the lead up to a country-wide launch in May of that year.

Of Note: LG said it is also extending its lineup of 8K televisions with six new models that leverage AI to display different content. The new 8K sets are also said to support the UHD Alliance’s Filmmaker Mode, which ensures that what a filmmaker intended the audience to see is actually displayed on its televisions. Samsung and Sony also showed 8K TV sets of various sizes.

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