Zaxcom Announces MRX214 Quad Wideband Receiver Module 

Zaxcom has debuted the MRX214 Quad Wideband Receiver Module for use with its Nova Recorder or RX-12/12-R Receiver Enclosures.

Zaxcom said the UHF diversity receiver consumes about half the power of a QRX212 and has an improved receiving range and 5db better dynamic range. It utilizes the High Q tunable tracking front end filter within its host device to combat interference and extend range.

The module is compatible with any Zaxcom digital recording wireless transmitter and with all Zaxcom modulations (Mono, Stereo, XR and ZHD). The modules can be easily added or hot-swapped as necessary.

The MRX214 sets a new Zaxcom standard for RF performance. The ultra-low noise floor (-135 dB) RF design will provide ultra-long range. The RF performance exceeds the previous generation of Zaxcom receivers by 5dB while enhancing the rejection of interfering signals from things like walkie talkies, cell phones and HD Television transmission by 10 dB.

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