How Globo TV Streamlined Post Operations with IP-Based KVM

Since launching in 1965, the Brazilian-based Globo TV has established itself as a leading content producer, attracting, entertaining and pulling together viewers from all over the world with original content and high production values. Challenge To maintain this reputation, Globo TV wanted to improve the workflow of its post-production control centre, which is used to monitor, manage and store all incoming and outgoing TV feeds as well as the associated computers that are dedicated to this media transfer process. It wanted operators to be able to access the 25 ingest computers from six different locations, eliminating the need to have users physically moving between each of the 25 computers, while also allowing them to display all or designated ingest streams on a video wall. After identifying these requirements, Globo TV contacted the team at Adder Technology to specify a solution. Having already used KVM technology to simplify the workflows in its audio editing rooms, Globo TV knew this was also the answer to its post-production problems, but it required specialist knowledge to help identify what was required. After understanding Globo TV’s needs as a business, Adder decided on a range of products that would work together using the existing network infrastructure.

Solution

The Globo TV team chose the IP-based, AdderLink Infinity (ALIF) Matrix solution, which consists of products designed to extend and matrix users’ access to the ingest computers across the entire post-production control room centre. This includes two AdderLink Infinity Managers (A.I.M.), 25 ALIF transmitters and six ALIF receivers.

The first step of installing this new solution into Globo TV’s facilities involved moving the physical computers away from the control room itself into a dedicated server room. The two A.I.M. units are also located in the server room, allowing for full matrix management of all ALIF transmitter and receiver units on the network. The second A.I.M. unit acts as backup to instantly take over management of the transmitters and receivers should the network switch, routing or hardware fail. Each user position now has the capability to switch between all computer sources, and to pull and push content at the touch of a button defined by presents and channels.

As for the 25 ALIF transmitters, each of these are connected to the 25 computers in the server room which then extend, via their standard IP network, to the six user stations. Each of these stations has its own ALIF receiver. The full installation process went without a hitch, and Globo TV had its new solution up and running without disruption.

Results

The new solution implemented by Globo TV’s tech team met the company’s goals by achieving improved workflow, enhanced user ergonomics and improved operational reliability through the introduction of levels of redundancy. No longer do the company’s operators need to physically move from one computer to the next to manage them — now they can seamlessly switch between numerous computers from a single workstation, with a single keyboard and mouse. This has refined and sped up the company’s post-production process.

More specifically, the ALIF solution provides Globo TV with AV and USB extension with instant switching between computers, zero-latency, dual link resolutions, dual cabling performance and network failover provided by the dual A.I.M. servers. Plus, having the physical computers located outside of the control room itself frees up space in the user area and helps to centralise computers together for the benefit of climate, maintenance and security.

Summary

KVM technology — and specifically IP-based, high performance KVM — has long proved its worth in control room environments. The increased speed and agility it affords helps users to make the right critical decisions at the right time, and the technology itself delivers increased operational reliability and user flexibility.

The Globo TV case is a classic example of how IP-based KVM technology can transform a control room environment and workflow through the use of technology. While the control room itself remains the same, the users inside of it can operate much more efficiently and productively, while also enjoying additional comfort thanks to the physical computers — each of which produces excess heat and considerable fan noise — being situated in a separate room. In turn, this helps Globo TV to maintain its emphasis on producing high quality content.

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