PMC Introduces Result6 Nearfield Reference Monitor

PMC has introduced Result6, a new two-way active nearfield monitor speaker system that provides high resolution sound and detailed, accurate and extended bass.

PMC said the two-way design features a 27mm soft-dome tweeter with dispersion grille and a mid/bass unit composed of a doped natural fiber, both custom-designed.

The LF driver was developed using a laser-based measurement system, recently introduced into the design process at PMC. It determines the electromechanical performance of the driver with extreme accuracy and allows the bass driver to be integrated with the Advanced Transmission Line — the proprietary bass-loading system at the heart of all PMC products.

The built-in dual amplifiers supply 65 and 100 watts of power to the HF and LF drivers respectively. Extremely efficient, low-distortion and high-damping-factor Class-D designs, they provide plenty of headroom and ensure the Result6 has a generous dynamic response given its compact dimensions.

The pure analog crossover, which was also designed specifically for the speaker using circuit-modeling techniques, keeps both drivers working at peak efficiency, while non-invasive limiting protects the LF and HF units from damage without adversely affecting their sound.

Rear-panel trim controls allow users ±10dB of amplifier output level adjustment to suit the precise requirements of the chosen listening environment.

A distinctive aspect of the speakers’s physical design is its finned HF driver surround. The D-Fins, as PMC call the HF diffraction fins, deliver two significant sonic benefits: they widen the loudspeaker’s already generous sweet spot to give excellent off-axis response over a larger area, and also block cabinet edge effects to ensure the result6's HF response remains razor-sharp and free of smearing.

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