Earthworks Introduces SV33 Vocal Microphone

Earthworks has introduced the SV33, a new high-end front address cardioid condenser microphone designed for voice work.

Earthworks said the mic features hand-tuned circuitry paired with a 14mm capsule and incorporates a cardioid polar pattern that is consistent up to 80 degrees off-axis. This allows the speaker or singer to move around freely in front of the microphone.

With low handling noise and a built-in windscreen to prevent plosives, the SV33 has a frequency response of 30 Hz to 33 kHz ±2 dB at five inches with a self-noise of 15 dBA with a 79 dB S/N ratio. The mic’s maximum acoustic input level is 145 dB SPL.

Every SV33 is individually handmade in the company's New Hampshire headquarters and is housed in an aluminum body with Nextel Dark Black plating for low reflectivity and durability.

The SV33 comes with a flexible mounting bracket for attaching the microphone to booms or stands. Each microphone comes in a custom designed carrying case.

Earthworks said the SV33 will ship in December with a street price of $2,399.00.

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