sE Electronics Introduces the sE8 True Condenser Microphone

sE Electronics has introduced the sE8, a handcrafted gold-sputtered small-diaphragm true condenser capsule manufactured by sE in its own capsule room.

sE Electronics said the sE8’s new backplate design capsule results in a more even, balanced sound and superior transient response as compared to any other small-capsule condenser of comparable price and beyond.

The sE8 also includes two low-cut filters (switchable between 80Hz and 160Hz) and two attenuation pads (-10dB or - 20dB), which provide it with the highest SPL handling capability and dynamic range in its class.

The body is finished with the same paint as sE’s latest microphones, plus a diamond-cut edge around the capsule. The XLR connector is gold-plated for loss-free, reliable use.

“You can apply any shelving filters or peak EQ without harshness, unpleasant colorations or distorted transients – it just stays natural,” said Thomas Stubics, sE’s product manager. “This is accomplished with an extremely short, efficient signal path, without the use of ICs or transformers, making the sE8 one of the quietest SDC microphones available today and by far the quietest in its class. Sonically, we feel it can easily be compared with mics that retail for more than $1,000 per pair.”

sE8 Stereo Pair

sE8 Stereo Pair

The sE8 will arrive in August, 2017, with a suggested retail price of $299. It ships with a mic clip, mic stand thread adapter and protective wind screen. The sE8 is also available as a matched stereo pair, which comes with a stereo mounting bar, two mic clips, two wind screens and a flight case. Matched pairs cost $599.

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