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Rode Introduces the VideoMicPro+

Rode Microphones has announced the VideoMic Pro+, an improved on-camera microphone with a host of new features.

Rode said the VideoMic Pro+ improves on the existing VideoMic Pro capsule/line tube and windshield, plus has an automatic power function (subject to plug-in power availability) for the run-and-gun shooter. It automatically turns the microphone off when unplugged from the camera.

Rode VideoMic Pro+

Rode VideoMic Pro+

A built-in battery door makes replacing the battery easier and is far less cumbersome than previous VideoMic models. The VideoMic Pro+ can be powered by the all-new and included Rode LB-1 lithium-ion rechargeable battery, two AA batteries or continuously via micro USB.

Digital switching aids the capture of a better audio signal at the source. It includes a two-stage high pass filter to reduce low frequencies such as rumble from traffic or air conditioning and a three stage gain control with +20dB function designed to improve audio quality on DSLR or mirrorless cameras.

It also includes high frequency boost to increase high frequencies enhancing detail and clarity in the recording. A safety channel ensures the signal does not clip when unexpected spikes occur.

“The VideoMic Pro+ is a new benchmark in on-camera microphones,” said Damien Wilson, CEO of the Rode and Freedman Group. “We have listened to our customers and are delivering the microphone they’ve asked for, with features such as the built-in battery door, automatic power function and included lithium-ion battery.

The VideoMic Pro+ ships with a 3.5mm TRS Cable, LB-1 lithium-ion rechargeable battery and includes Rode’s 10-year warranty. It is now shipping to Rode dealers. Price is $299.99.

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