TVLogic Debuts Reference 4K, OLED and HDR Monitors for Broadcast

TVLogic, a supplier of LCD and OLED High-Definition (HD) displays, has introduced a series of new 4K HDR and OLED reference monitors that address the growing demands of industry pros working with such new formats in broadcast, production, and post-production applications.

The new TVLogic line-up includes a 31-inch 4K HDR Reference Master monitor (LUM-310R) featuring 2000 nit maximum luminance, a 55-inch UHD OLED HDR monitor for broadcast QC and post production (LEM-550R), a 5.5-inch HD OLED viewfinder/onboard monitor offering stunning cinematic quality (VFM-055A) and a 17-inch QC-Grade HD Dual-Channel LCD monitor with wide viewing angles (LVM-171S). The new products were all on display during the recent 2017 NAB Show.

Wes Donahue, Director of Channel Sales & Marketing, TVLogic USA & Latin America, said that as high resolution image technologies such as 4K and HDR continue to struggle toward standardization, “the need for reference monitors that support a range of new imaging formats is crucial.”

The LUM-310R is a 4K HDR Reference Master production monitor with a 31-inch wide Super-IPS 4K (4096 x 2160) LCD display and a local-dimming backlight array designed to reproduce reference HDR content at a maximum luminance of 2,000 nits with a simultaneous deep black minimum of 0.002 nits. It supports various HDR standards such as SMPTE ST2084, ST2086 and ST2094 [pending], Hybrid-Log Gamma (HLG), and more. It also supports multiple color gamuts including Rec.709, DCI-P3, and Rec.2020. Signal I/O includes 3G/6G/12G-SDI input via one, two, or four SDI connections as well as HDMI (ver.2.0).

The VFM-055A is a compact 5.5-inch OLED on-camera viewfinder monitor with native HD (1920x1080) resolution.

The VFM-055A is a compact 5.5-inch OLED on-camera viewfinder monitor with native HD (1920x1080) resolution.

The LEM-550R is a QC-Grade HDR monitor for broadcast and post production with a 55-inch OLED panel with UHD resolution of 3840 × 2160. The OLED panel can reproduce a maximum luminance of up to 750 nits. The LEM-550R supports various HDR standards such as SMPTE ST2084, ST2086 and ST2094 [pending], Hybrid-Log Gamma (HLG), and others. It also supports multiple color gamuts including Rec.709, DCI, and Rec.2020. Signal I/O includes 3G/6G/12G-SDI input via one, two, or four SDI connections as well as HDMI (ver.2.0).

The VFM-055A is a 5.5-inch OLED (organic LED) on-camera viewfinder monitor with native 1920 x 1080 resolution. It offers truly cinematic image quality with deep blacks, wide-gamut color reproduction, a very wide viewing angle, and support for multiple video formats via 3G-SDI and HDMI 1.4 inputs. Useful functions include cinema camera log-to-linear LUT conversion, HDMI-SDI cross-converted output, waveform and vector scope, markers, focus assist, audio level meters and more.

The new LVM-171S is TVLogic’s top QC-Grade 17-inch model with a 16.5 inch IPS LCD panel with 1920 x 1080 native resolution, wide-gamut reproduction (up to DCI-P3) enhanced contrast ratio and wide viewing angle all unmatched by other LCD monitors. A completely redesigned video processing unit provides powerful dual-channel performance and artifact-free image reproduction. Support for various cinema camera log-to-linear LUTs, easy field upgradability and a full array of image processing features are standard.

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