DP Roy Wagner Uses a Single Rotolight Anova PRO on New Feature Film

Roy Wagner, an award-winning director of photography, has chosen to use a single Rotolight Anova PRO bi-color LED studio light for his new feature film, Trouble Sleeping.

A 50-year veteran in the film industry, Wagner has used all kinds of lights in his career — from tungsten and fluorescents to LEDs. He has also long been an advocate of using natural light.

Now, he has shot an entire feature — Trouble Sleeping — with director, Robert Adetuyi, using the Rotolight Anova PRO light as the sole source. The shoot took place at Pinewood Studios in London.

Actors on the set of Trouble Sleeping

Actors on the set of Trouble Sleeping

Rotolight’s Anova PRO delivers versatility, accurate color rendering and soft light output — making it ideal for cinematographers, videographers and photographers. With an output of up to 7,200 lux at three feet, the studio and location LED is still able to deliver flattering, soft light output.

“I have often spoken of simplicity in image creation, and had wanted to do a feature with just one light and one lens,” said Wagner. “Of course, this seldom happens, but I was given the chance to do it on Trouble Sleeping.

“I chose the Rotolight system because I knew it could accurately reproduce the color and power I needed. We did not use any fill, and used the Rotolight as a very articulated light source.”

One feature of the Anova PRO particularly relevant for users like Wagner is CineSFX. It provides a suite of customizable cinematic lighting effects, such as fire, lightning, sirens and gunshots. It eliminates the need for traditional flicker box workflows.

Director Robert Adetuyi speaks with actors

Director Robert Adetuyi speaks with actors

Rotolight said the Anova PRO is 300 percent more power efficient than its LED competitors, enabling greater run time when running on battery on location.

Rotolight has found a way of filtering a notch of blue wavelength that is harsh on actors eyes. On Trouble Sleeping, every actor took the time to ask about the light, and responded to the gentle quality of the light.

Alongside the creative control it gave him, Wagner also praised the light’s practical aspects.

“It survives the rough handling of everyday production, and crews who have very little time to baby equipment,” Wagner said. “Crews are pleased with how easily mounted and how simple it is to control the lights. They can be operated from the back of the fixture or from my iPhone. And producers are very happy with the reduced cost of the lighting package.”

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