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AIMS Membership Continues to Gather Momentum

Embrionix, Panasonic and Tektronix are the latest key broadcast supply companies to support the transition to IP via open standards and interoperability.

Key technology and major industry players are continuing to join the ranks of the Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS) member companies, with the objective of promoting open standards and interoperability in the transition to IP.

Embrionix, the Quebec based leader in the manufacture of unique audio and video processing and conversion devices embedded in a SFP (Standard Form factor Pluggable) platform, has announced its membership of AIMS. The company provides anew approach in the product interface market for broadcast manufacturers, designing and manufacturing advanced SMPTE VIDEO SFP device’s to close the gap between 12G-SDI, 6G-SDI, 3G-SDI, HD-SDI, SD-SDI fiber optic deployments, 12G-SDI, 6G-SDI, 3G-SDI, HD-SDI, SD-SDI coaxial deployments, and emerging technology deployments, including HDMI, composite video and Ethernet.

Panasonic is a multinational with global business divisions operating in the broadcast and AV technology sectors, where it is a world leading supplier of broadcast, pro AV and audio-video systems. As a provider of professional solutions for government and commercial enterprises of all sizes, its vast product portfolio includes solutions for HD video content capture and production, unified business communications and visual communications (including displays and digital signage). Panasonic’s aligning itself with the AIMS roadmap for an open standards transition to IP is of major significance in broadcast and AV content industries.

Also joining AIMS is Tektronix, the renowned industry name in test and measurement equipment. The company’s extensive product portfolio and service provision extends across the breadth of broadcast network and transmission formats and standards, including that very latest IP based protocols.

Membership in AIMS is available to all individuals and companies that support open standards and share a commitment to the group’s founding principles.

For more about the importance of open standards and interoperability in the broadcast and media industry, visit the alliance website at www.aimsalliance.org and download the Alliance for IP Media Solutions’ white paper “An Argument for Open IP Standards in the Media Industry."

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