ChyronHego Coach Paint Provides NBA’s Atlanta Hawks With Powerful Analysis Tools

ChyronHego’s Coach Paint video analysis software is being used by the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks to enhance clips in the team’s video library, illustrating terminology for players and visually reinforcing coaching points.

Displayed throughout the Hawks’ training facilities at the Emory Sports Medicine Complex and available on tablets for individual review, the painted clips give players and coaches a convenient and engaging way to learn or review critical plays, offensive and defensive strategies, and player positioning.

“We use Coach Paint to paint perfect examples of our terminology and get everyone on board so they understand how it should look,” said Dipesh Mistry, head video coordinator for the Atlanta Hawks. “The software is powerful but easy to use, and painted clips look really professional. Coaches take notice, and your team takes notice. Everyone in the building takes notice. It wasn’t by design, but now everyone speaks the same language, whether it’s the players, training staff, scouts working in the front office, the head coach, or the GM.”

Coach Paint comes complete out of the box with tools including player cut-out, spotlight, zoom, player tracking, and zone tracking. Built-in play-calling capabilities make it easy to create graphics like those on broadcast games and highlight shows. The software can be customized to incorporate unique graphics, effects, and other elements that make painted clips more relatable and memorable for players.

The Atlanta Hawks run a select loop of painted video clips on screens throughout the training facility — the weight room, the breakfast area, the locker room, the training room — to cover key terms and concepts and to help players prepare for upcoming games. To date, the Hawks’ video team has painted about 1,000 clips highlighting defensive and offensive elements from the team’s current playbook as well as new ideas brought forward for discussion by the coaching staff. Rather than spend time drawing out different scenarios, coaches can manipulate and enhance game video to focus on specific details related to player positioning and movement.

Coach Paint is also a powerful tool for post-game analysis. Following each game, the Hawks video team uses the software to create a themed highlight reel showing a pattern of successes or failures. It might be seven clips showing where players were out of position — and where they should have been instead — or a series of clips showing every shot contested successfully — and magnifying each to re-emphasize the great job players did during that game.

“If you’re hammering away with just X’s and O’s during a video session, you’re going to lose players’ attention pretty quickly,” added Mistry. “By painting clips with Coach Paint and adding a few fun graphics here and there, you can have a little fun with it. Because you’re highlighting actual players and using visual analysis tools, you keep everyone engaged, and you capture nuances you wouldn’t by just scribbling on a white board.”

“We work closely with Coach Paint users to make sure they are getting the most out of the product,” said Joe Boyle, ChyronHego’s North America sales director for Coach Paint. “Dipesh and his team are very adept at using the software to connect with players and to communicate key coaching messages. He’s taking full advantage of Coach Paint, and we’re using his experience and feedback to continue building out capabilities that raise the bar for video analysis and illustration.”

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