Sony Upgrades PTZ Remote Camera With Free-D

Designed for remote production and efficient operations, the v2.1 firmware upgrade to BRC-X1000 and BRC-H800 cameras will allow producers and operators to simplify their VR/AR production workflows. The cameras will output tracking data over IP, using the industry standard Free-D protocol.

This enables the cameras to directly feed the pan, tilt, zoom, focus and iris, as well as the position of the BRC cameras in real time. Further, it will allow productions to incorporate VR/AR into their live content, such as expanded sets or scenery, live animations, e-sports and graphic overlays.

Free-D protocol is an industry standard protocol, supported by major AR/VR solutions providers. BRC-X1000 and BRC-H800 are currently under verification with The Future Group (Pixotope), ReckeenVizrt and Zero Density, and plan to support integration with other partners supporting Free-D data in the near future.

Sony state, “In the context of social distancing and reduced operational crews allowed, the update will also improve the pan/tilt/zoom operations of the BRC-X1000 and BRC-H800. A reduced minimum speed allows the camera to track more accurately an object on the set and facilitate shot framing. The output will therefore be more realistic and smoother, even with non-professional operators.

“What’s more, the cameras will now start to focus as soon as the preset recall is done, at the same time as the PTZ function, so that the camera movements look more natural. Control when using a physical remote controller such as a pan-bar one will also be supported.

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