Leader Adds MaxFALL/CLL HDR Metadata Error Logging

ZEN Series test instruments help operators see when pixels are out of HDR range limits.

Leader Electronics announced the addition of MaxFALL and MaxCLL HDR metadata error logging tools for production studios, postproduction suites and media laboratories working with SMPTE ST.2086 metadata to grade high dynamic range video. This new feature complements the recently launched SER31 Colorimetry Zone Display ‘real-time’ false-color display plug-in module. It is fully compatible with Leader ZEN series broadcast test and measurement instruments which comprise the LV5300, LV5350 and LV5600 waveform monitors plus the LV7300 and LV7600 rasterizers.

With this enhancement, Leader ZEN series instruments allow operators to ensure that the MaxFALL and MaxCLL HDR metadata accurately reflect the content of their productions by specifying limits for MaxFALL and MaxCLL values. The integral Cinelite Advanced light meter can be used to locate out-of-range pixels and confirm their values both on the picture display and on the waveform monitor.

SMPTE ST.2086

The SMPTE ST.2086 (Mastering Display Color Volume Metadata Supporting High Luminance and Wide Color Gamut Images) standard specifies the metadata used to define the color primaries, white point, and luminance range of a display used in mastering HDR video content. It includes information such as MaxFALL (Maximum Frame Average Light Level) and MaxCLL (Maximum Content Light Level) static values, encoded as SEI messages within the video stream.

MaxCLL defines the maximum light level, in nits, of any single pixel within an encoded HDR video stream or file. It should be measured during or after mastering. If content is kept within the MaxCLL of a display’s HDR range and a hard clip is set for light levels beyond the display’s maximum value, the display’s maximum CLL can be used as the MaxCLL metadata value.

MaxFALL Metadata - Maximum Frame Average Light Level – defines the maximum average light level, in nits, for any single frame within an encoded HDR video stream or file. MaxFALL is calculated by converting the digital value of each frame into its corresponding nits value and averaging those values.

MaxFALL/CLL error logging is available as a free download to Leader customers with the SER23 HDR software license. It is part of the v4.6 firmware update and can be accessed via the MyLeader web-site.

CTV, one of Europe's longest established providers of mobile television production facilities, has chosen Leader LV7300 and LV7600 rasterizing waveform monitors as master reference instruments for its OB3 and OB12 outside broadcast vehicles.

CTV, one of Europe's longest established providers of mobile television production facilities, has chosen Leader LV7300 and LV7600 rasterizing waveform monitors as master reference instruments for its OB3 and OB12 outside broadcast vehicles.

Europe’s CTV Invests in Leader T&M

"Leader test instruments have proved highly reliable, efficient and operator friendly right back to our first purchase of LV7770 multi-SDI rasterizers six years ago," comments Paul Francis, CTV's Chief Technical Officer. "Some of the projects we work on are massive in scale, taking in feeds from well over 100 cameras. High-precision monitoring of HD and UHD signal flow is vital, both to achieve accurate matching of incoming feeds and to ensure that we are maintaining the full available dynamic range from source right through to output. This latest purchase comprises 12 LV7300 and two LV7600 instruments. Both models can be fully operated from the front panel which, combined with their compact size, makes them ideal for use in OB suites. We normally assign the output to a multiscreen display where it can be viewed easily from any part of a production suite. The LV7300 and LV7600 have a very similar control menu structure so operators can move freely between them. The resultant measurements are precise, repeatable and can be copied off to USB memory for easy logging or sharing."

"These instruments fully live up to their reputation as the Swiss Army knives of the broadcast video and audio production industry," adds Thameside TV Sales Manager Chris Margrave-Gregory. "Leader's LV7300 in particular packs more features into its size than practically any broadcast-grade test instrument on the market while still maintaining the highly robust build quality which is essential in any product taken out on the road. Both of the LV7600 units include the SER03 16-channel audio display option and one also has the SER05 10G IP input and analysis module. We pre-installed these accessories as plug-ins. All 12 instruments can be upgraded to 4K when required via Leader's ZEN-series software unlocking path."

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