Sennheiser Digital 6000 Used At Super Bowl Halftime Show

Sennheiser SKM 6000 transmitters, coupled with MD 9235 capsules, were used at the Super Bowl LIV Halftime Show. It was viewed by more than 104 million people.

ATK Audiotek handled the audio design for the pre-game festivities, referee microphones and the Halftime Show for the 23rd Super Bowl in a row. Once the clock ran out after the second quarter, the Halftime Show crew had approximately six minutes to dispatch and assemble the entire stage, located nearby the field’s 30-yard line.

Antenna systems for the wireless microphones were set up in advance on either sideline prior to the game. They were mounted along the stadium wall behind the team benches.

“It is not a traditional concert environment where you can put antennas out on the side of the stage where they are relatively close to the performer,” said Gary Trenda, lead RF technician for Professional Wireless Systems (PWS) based in Orlando, Florida. “We deployed antennas on the sidelines and aimed them at where the stage was going to be; then we used an RF-over-fiber system to connect back to the receivers, which were in a rack room under the stands.”

The wireless system must perform flawlessly – despite not having the advantage of close proximity to the stage. “In a show like this, reliability is critical,” said Trenda. “We’ve got to pick up the signal at a longer distance, and it really needs to be rock solid.”

The RF team deployed four channels of Sennheiser Digital 6000 wireless – three separate mic channels for Shakira, and one for Bad Bunny. Shakira sang several songs through a gold sparkled SKM 6000 handheld transmitter and MD 9235 dynamic cardioid capsule, before being joined onstage by Bad Bunny, who also sang through an SKM 6000 – colored in neon yellow, coupled with a red MD 9235 capsule.

As one would expect, the RF environment at the Super Bowl can be challenging. “In the stadium area alone, there are probably 500 frequencies of mics and IEM-type systems – so we are really looking to zero in on the mics we care about and filter out anything else. This is why we applied 6 MHz cavity tuned filters in front of the Sennheiser receivers. The filters are tuned specifically to the frequencies we were using for that pair of microphones.” 

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