Haivision Announces Play Pro, A Free SRT Player

Haivision Play Pro is presented as a free mobile player from the developers of the SRT protocol.

Now available for iOS devices in the App Store, Haivision Play Pro offers streamers, developers, and broadcasters a quick and easy way to watch and monitor SRT video streams from anywhere on a mobile device.

Haivision originally developed and open sourced the widely adopted SRT (Secure Reliable Transport) protocol to support high performance streaming over any network. With Play Pro, Haivision enables organizations to monitor low-latency video. The related app provides broadcasters with a way to monitor any feed or channel anywhere using the SRT protocol.

“Broadcast producers, directors, executives, and on-air talent can monitor contribution streams and view return feeds in the field, whether they are the live to air streams, feeds supporting remote interviews, or even teleprompter feeds directly from the editorial desk,” Marcus Schioler, VP Product Marketing, Haivision. “The end-to-end latency achievable with Play Pro is less than half of a second, enabling high quality real-time interactivity.”

“With Play Pro, users can easily tune to an SRT stream or create and save channel lists that can be securely shared with team members needing access to a range of feeds. Furthermore, channel lists can be centrally managed ensuring that subscribed users are always able to access only the streams they need.”

Haivision Play Pro provides H.264 and HEVC playback; support for low-latency encrypted SRT; UDP unicast or multicast, and HLS streams up to 4K/UHD 2160p60. It also provides SRT secure streaming with AES 128- or 256-bit encryption. Users can create and save custom channel lists for sharing by email or publishing to a network location to make simple channel lists available throughout the organization.

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